My academic career

2005:

image

Present:

image

(Source: thedefenderoftheearth)

Miyajima Deer The deer are a symbol of Miyajima and you can see them elegantly wandering the island everywhere. The deer are sacred and believed to be a messenger of the gods in Shinto. They are treated very well by the locals and aren’t afraid of people.


darksilenceinsuburbia:

Osborne Macharia

Ollarripok Loosarrat

  • THE MORANS (WARRIORS AND GUARDIANS OF ISARRAT), A HOMESTEAD COMPRISING OF BETWEEN 20-40 MORANS.

ETHNOFICTION

Ethnofiction is a neologism which refers to an ethnographic docufiction, a blend of documentary and fictional film in the area of visual anthropology. It is a film type in which, by means of fictional narrative or creative imagination, often improvising, the portrayed characters (natives) play their own roles as members of an ethnic or social group.

Jean Rouch is considered to be the father of ethnofiction. Ethnologist, he soon discovers that a filmmaker interferes with the event he registers. His camera is never a candid camera.The behavior of the portrayed individuals, the natives, will be affected by its presence. Contrary to the principles of Marcel Griaule, his mentor, for Rouch a non-participating camera registering “pure” events in ethnographic research (like filming a ritual without interfering with it) is a pre-concept denied by practice.

An ethnographer cameraman will be accepted as a natural partner by the actors who play their roles. The cameraman will be one of them. He may even be possessed by the rhythm of dancers during a ritual celebration and induced in a state of cine-trance. Going further than his predecessors, Jean Rouch introduces the actor as a tool in research.


fotojournalismus:

Faces of Tibet by Steve McCurry

(via stevemccurrystudios)


likeafieldmouse:

Jonathan May - Awake (2013)


historical-nonfiction:

Photographs from The North American Indian, a 20-volume work published between 1907 and 1930, filled with over 1,500 photographs as well as records of tribal lore and history, biographical sketches, and descriptions of traditional foods, housing, clothing, ceremonies, and customs. American photographer Edward S. Curtis wanted to capture all he could before it vanished. The pictures cover almost all of the USA, even the ice along the Arctic Ocean and the desert border with Mexico. While painting an idealized picture, Curtis’ images also contrasted with the public’s perception of Native Americans as impediments to be moved off useful land.

(Source: curtis.library.northwestern.edu)

beautiesofafrique:

Imazighen woman, North Africa


kanakaknowledge:

Hawaiian Men

In my culture the tāne (Men) perform the hura just as much, if not more, than the wāhine (Women). 

Hārau - Ke Kai ʻO Kahiki (Te Tai ʻO Tahiti)


divaneee:

Kazakh


beautiesofafrique:

Uganda gay pride party after anti-homosexual law is overturned

Entebbe (Uganda) (AFP) - Dancing and waving rainbow-coloured flags, Ugandan activists held their first gay pride rally Saturday since the overturning of a tough anti-homosexuality law, which authorities have appealed. ”This event is to bring us together. Everyone was in hiding before because of the anti-homosexuality law,” organiser Sandra Ntebi told AFP. "It is a happy day for all of us, getting together,” Ntebi said, noting that police had granted permission for the invitation-only “Uganda Pride” rally. The overturned law, condemned as “abominable” by rights groups but popular among many Ugandans, called for proven homosexuals to be jailed for life.

The constitutional court threw it out on a technicality on August 1, six months after it took effect, and the government swiftly filed an appeal, while lawmakers have signed a petition for a new vote on the bill.

Homosexuality remains illegal in Uganda, punishable by a jail sentence. But it is no longer illegal to promote homosexuality, and Ugandans are no longer obliged to denounce gays to the authorities

Amid music and laughter, activists gathered at botanical gardens on the shores of Lake Victoria, barely a kilometre (half a mile) from the presidential palace at Entebbe, a key town some 35 kilometres from the capital Kampala. ”Some Ugandans are gay. Get over it,” read one sticker a man had pasted onto his face. - ‘Now I have the courage’ -

Ugandan Deputy Attorney General Fred Ruhinda said Saturday that state lawyers had lodged an appeal against the ruling at the Supreme Court, the country’s highest court.

"We are unsatisfied with the court ruling," Ruhinda told AFP. "The law was not intended to victimise gay people, it was for the common good." In their surprise ruling last week, judges said it had been passed without the necessary quorum of lawmakers in parliament. Rights groups said the law triggered a sharp increase in arrests and assaults on members of the country’s lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.

Homophobia is widespread in Uganda, where American-style evangelical Christianity is on the rise. Gay men and women face frequent harassment and threats of violence. On Saturday, however, activists celebrated openly.

"Since I discovered I was gay I feared coming out, but now I have the courage after the law was thrown out," Alex Musoke told AFP, one of more than 100 people at the event. One pair of activists waved a rainbow flag with a slogan appealing for people to “join hands” to end the “genocide” of homosexuals. Some wore masks for fear of being identified — Uganda’s tabloid newspapers have previously printed photographs of prominent activists — while others showed their faces openly and wore colourful fancy dress. But activist Pepe Onziema said he and his colleagues would not rest until they were sure the law was gone for good. ”Uganda is giving a bad example, not only to the region but to the world, by insisting on this law,” he said.

"We are Africans, we want to show an African struggle by civil society."

There was little police presence, and no one came to protest the celebration, even if many in the town said they did not approve."This is unbelievable, I can’t imagine being a gay," said motorbike taxi driver William Kamurasi in disgust."It’s a shame to Uganda. Police must stop these activities of the gays."

- Lawmakers demand new vote -

Critics said President Yoweri Museveni signed the law to win domestic support ahead of a presidential election set for 2016, which will be his 30th year in power. But it lost him friends abroad, with several international donors freezing or redirecting millions of dollars of government aid, saying the country had violated human rights and democratic principles.

US Secretary of State John Kerry likened the law to anti-Semitic legislation in Nazi Germany.

Analysts suggest that Museveni secretly encouraged last week’s court ruling as it provided a way to avoid the appearance of caving in to foreign pressure. But gay rights activists warn the battle is not over.

Lawmakers signed a petition calling for a new vote on the bill, and to bypass parliamentary rules that require it be formally reintroduced from scratch — a process that could take years.

Source

boericke:

isabelpike:

This is a picture of Kasubi tombs, Uganda’s only cultural world heritage site. The large thatched structure is the burial site for the kings of the Baganda, one of Uganda’s many tribes. There are many other buildings in Uganda that are architecturally striking, but most of these other buildings have been influenced by the British colonial rule or Uganda’s significant Indian population. Are the tombs protected because of their pure Ugandaness?


cultureincart:

The cute little monk in Xichan Temple, Fuzhou, southeast China’s Fujian Province.


soulrevision:

HAPPY INTERNATIONAL DAY OF THE WORLDS INDIGENOUS PEOPLES!!!

Celebrating the great history and culture, and protecting the languages and lands of indigenous people worldwide. 


yagazieemezi:

‘If we delve into the core of colonialism then we see that the whole thing was one big plundering expedition, one continuous assault and robbery that involved massacres and mass murders, gold and bloodbaths, rapes, slave-trading and genocide’.Ashkan Honarvar has taken this subject and visualised various aspects of European colonial history. The hunt for wealth and power, the submission of the indigenous people, the abuse of religion as a justification and the animal-like behaviour.’
 
All collages are handmade! - By Ashkarn Honavar